Sunday, September 20, 2020

July 25, 2020  NEW YORK (AP) — Jamal Adams’ wish was finally granted: He’s leaving New York in a stunning trade. The Jets dealt the disgruntled star safety to the Seattle Seahawks on Saturday, splitting with a gifted player whose relationship with the franchise quickly deteriorated because of a contract dispute.

New York received a massive haul in the deal, sending a 2022 fourth-round draft pick along with Adams to the Seahawks for a 2021 first-rounder, a 2022 first-rounder, a 2021 third-rounder and safety Bradley McDougald — pending physicals.

“While we had maintained our interest in Jamal Adams having a long and successful career with the Jets, we know it’s important to be prepared and willing to adjust to new offers and circumstances,” general manager Joe Douglas said in a statement. “As I have always said, my job is to listen to calls and this offer was one we could not ignore.”

The deal ended contentious several months for Adams and the Jets, a situation that increasingly appeared headed for a divorce when the two-time Pro Bowl selection criticized ownership early in the week and then took shots at coach Adam Gase and Douglas in an interview with the Daily News published Friday.

“To NY & especially the Jets fans, I love you & will always love you.” Adams wrote in a Twitter post. “You all will hold a special place in my heart forever. When I came into the league, you embraced me & watched me grow! We went through it all together. Thank you for the Luv & support these 3 years. #Prez Out.”

Adams followed that up with a message to the Seahawks and their fans in a Twitter post that included a graphic of the safety in his new team’s uniform.

“You have a man on a mission,” he wrote, “a man all in on winning a Super Bowl, being the best leader & teammate he can be, & a man who will give everything he has to the city of Seattle and to the 12s all across the world. Thank you for believing in me!”

 The 24-year-old former LSU star was drafted sixth overall by the Jets in 2017. He quickly established himself as a fan favorite and one of the best players at his position, being selected for the last two Pro Bowls and making the All-Pro squad last year.

But Adams’ relationship with the franchise began to take a turn last October.

The safety was angered when Douglas fielded phone calls from teams inquiring about Adams’ availability at the trade deadline. Douglas made it clear the cost for Adams would be exorbitant, a sign the Jets had no interest in dealing him. But Adams felt the team shouldn’t have even listened to other teams’ offers.

Adams went a week without speaking to Douglas or Gase before smoothing things after talking with CEO and chairman Christopher Johnson.

Adams was seeking an extension from the Jets, who didn’t budge since they had control over his contract through 2021 and could have also potentially placed the franchise tag on him in 2022. Douglas and Johnson said they hoped to make Adams a Jet for life, but Adams wanted his contract situation resolved this year.

When it appeared that wouldn’t happen, Adams made it clear he wanted out. He asked the team for a trade last month and listed several teams to which he’d prefer to be dealt — including Seattle. Adams then used social media to criticize the team and capped things with the Daily News interview in which he said he didn’t feel Gase was “the right leader for this organization to reach the Promised Land” and saying Douglas wasn’t being straight with him or his agents.

ATLANTA (AP) — Rapper and actor T.I. has settled civil charges with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that he helped promote a fraudulent cryptocurrency. T.I., whose real name is Clifford Harris, agreed to a civil settlement with the SEC that was announced Friday. He is paying a $75,000 fine and agreeing not to sell or market similar securities for at least five years. Harris got into trouble, the SEC said, because he used his social media accounts to promote FLiK, falsely claiming to be a co-owner, and asked an unnamed actor and comedian to also promote FLiK, providing language calling it T.I.’s “new venture.” The SEC says both of those moves broke federal laws against selling securities without registering with the SEC. The charges against Harris were part of a larger enforcement action against others including film producer Ryan Felton, who faces wire fraud and other charges in a 28-count indictment unsealed Wednesday.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Legal advocates are lining up on both sides of actor Bill Cosby’s appeal as the Pennsylvania Supreme Court prepares to review his 2018 sex assault conviction. Cosby was the first celebrity to go on trial in the #MeToo era, and his appeal could resolve lingering questions about how the cases should be tried. For starters, the high court will try to clarify when other accusers can testify against a defendant — and when the additional testimony amounts to character assassination. Public defenders in Philadelphia, in a friend-of-the-court brief filed in Cosby’s appeal, noted that courts have given conflicting guidance on the issue.

NEW YORK (AP) — The Council of Fashion Designers of America gave its top fashion awards on Monday to Gabriela Hearst for womenswear and Kerby Jean-Raymond for menswear. The two designers led a group of winners that the CFDA said was the most diverse in the 39-year history of the awards. It was the second honor in two days for Jean-Raymond, the prominent Black founder of the Pyer Moss label, who was also named Designer of the Year by Harlem’s Fashion Row in a virtual ceremony on Sunday. The CFDA winners also included Telfar Clemens, who won the accessories award, and Christopher John Rogers, who won for American emerging designer. All four were first-time winners.

NEW YORK (AP) — There’s a scene in a new documentary about Paris Hilton, where the so-called socialite is speaking with former classmates from a Utah boarding school. They joke about how on her reality series “The Simple Life,” Hilton pretended to be clueless over many things— including how to perform any sort of manual labor. One bluntly described it as “some straight-up (expletive),” as they all laughed. “I don’t think you had like a high-pitch voice back then,” was another observation. None of this is a surprise to Hilton. What’s revealed in “This is Paris,” which debuted for free Monday on Hilton’s YouTube channel, is that the ultra-glam, baby-talking young woman whose standard line was “that’s hot,” was a manufactured caricature not just for fame but self-protection, too.